A Unique Workshop

For those of you who live close to Rhode Island, we are offering a unique workshop to help you:

Create Your Own Wedding Ceremony

Sunday, November 13, 2016, 2-5PM

The Reynolds School, Room 207, 235 High Street, Bristol, Rhode Island

Who knows more about your love than you? Now you and your betrothed can create a ceremony that perfectly expresses that love–complete with greetings, vows, declarations of intent, prayers and blessings.

Course includes 145-page manual with hundreds of time-honored passages that can be combined into the perfect expression of your feelings & thoughts. Instruction is non-denominational and includes follow-up support.

Lead by Cheryl & Charlie Cavalconte, wedding officiants and ritual designers, who have helped thousands of couples of all faiths plan their special ceremony.

Please, advance registration required; workshop limited to eight participants for personalized attention.

$125/Couple $85/Individual

To reserve your place for November 13th 

(Future Workshops:12/11.1/8.2/5.3/5,4/2 each 2-5pm)

ccavalconte@yahoo.com

Handfasting Ritual

Handfasting is an interesting ritual. Many cultures have a form of Handfasting and the varieties of performing this ritual are as varied as the cultures that use it. Handfasting is a ritual of binding. The couple, after exchanging their rings with each other, is bound together in a covenant of marriage, of fidelity, and of love.

The ritual has, over the years, evolved. Today  couples “Handfast” with a variety of “handfastners” reflecting their profession, hobby or sport. So for instances,  electricians have used  wire or zip ties, police officers, zip ties and handcuffs. Some first responders /firefighters use a smaller piece of rescue rope. Mountain climbers have used rope and the clips called carabiners. Sailors rope and halyard line, nurses IV tubing, and surgeons, surgical tubing.  Whimsical, yes, but great variation of the ritual  to make the ceremony more unique and personal. Ribbon is most often used. The colors white, ivory, the color theme of the wedding the most popular.

We hope you have enjoyed your visit and this has been helpful.

Charlie and Cheryl Cavalconte
Wedding Celebrants, Ceremony Script Writers, Consultants
Please like us, share and visit our other sites to help prepare for your big day.
Www.createyourownweddingceremony.com
Www.weddingministersri.com

Why no images on our blog?  Wedding images come and go with fashion and with the season, so many and so varied. We feel it is the words you share with each other, during your wedding ceremony, that are some of the most significant and intimate words you will ever share and, like gems, are unique and personal.

VOWS: Ways To Celebrate Your love

Each couple feels differently about the way they actually say/proclaim their marriage wedding vows. We have seen couples celebrate their vows in a few different ways. Below are a some ideas about how you are able to  share your vows with each other before your families and friends.

1-The celebrant/minister/officiant asks each one of the couple a few questions and each responds individually with “I DO” to the questions.

2-The celebrant/minister/officiant asks the vow questions to the couple as a couple and the couple responds together as a couple saying “WE DO” to the questions.

3-The celebrant/minister/officiant reads a few words and each one of the couple “Repeats” the words spoken by the officiant after the officiant, thus the statement: “Repeat after me”

4- The couple reads their vows to each other. This style has the couple focused on the reading of the vows holding the paper/card/book that the vows are written on. This presents challenges if the couple wants to both hold both hands and look into each others eyes. The focus becomes more on reading the vows than being focused on each other.

5-The celebrant/minister/officiant asks each party a question and each responds individually with “I DO” to the question OR the celebrant asks the couple the vow questions to the couple as a couple and the couple responds together as a couple saying “WE DO” to the questions. THEN the celebrant/minister/officiant reads a few words to each one of the couple individually and each individually “Repeats” the words spoken by the officiant.

6-Any combination of the about that will work the best for the two of you.

We strongly encourage not to share your vows from memory since the focus of “wanting to remember the vows perfectly” creates further anxiety by of not wanting to make a mistake if will the vows be remembered correctly. Speaking the vows from memory often becomes the focus, so much of the ceremony is missed due to the worry about “getting the vows right and will I remember them”.

We hope you have enjoyed your visit and this has been helpful.

Charlie and Cheryl Cavalconte
Wedding Celebrants, Ceremony Script Writers, Consultants
Please like us, share and visit our other sites to help prepare for your big day.
Www.createyourownweddingceremony.com
Www.weddingministersri.com
We are extremely pleased to have Caitlin Nash, MPH, RD, LDN join us to help prepare you and your body for the big day. Cait is a Personal Trainer, Registered Dietician & Beachboy Coach.
Please visit her exciting websites. Let her help you become a healthier you:
Www.shakeology.com/caitRD
Www.teambeachbody.com/caitRD
Www.facebook.com/CaitNashRD

Why no images on our blog?  Wedding images come and go and there are so many and so varied. We feel it is the words you share with each other, during your wedding ceremony, that are some of the most significant and intimate words you will ever share and, like gems, are personally yours.

Who is Walking Whom Down the Aisle?

There are lots of options about how to “get down the aisle” to the place of your wedding ceremony:
The classic one: Dad with bride
Then Dad and Mom with bride
Then sometimes Mom only with bride.
Then there are the variations with a male family or friend walking bride
Sometimes bride and her children
Sometimes bride and THEIR children
Sometimes bride and groom and their children
Sometimes the couple themselves walk down the aisle hand in hand:
Bride and groom
Bride and bride
Groom and groom

But grooms, whatever you do- DO NOT- repeat  DO NOT arrive by helicopter, or boat or parachute or ATV or tractor or any other means and have it be a surprise to your bride and her mother!

Most importantly, let the ritual of your wedding ceremony reflect the reality of your love and lives.

Reminder: while walking down the aisle and who does the honors  to walk with you is a tradition, it is also a tradition that has a bit of a dark side. The tradition, also called “giving away”, recalls a time of prearranged marriages and the subservient place of a woman to her birth family now being transferred to her marriage family. We have come along way, however, there is a constant need for mindful awareness of marriage being a lifegiving, mutual, collaborative, and equal partnership in love.

Enjoy
Charlie and Cheryl Cavalconte
http://www.weddingministersri.com

Ceremony Seating

Last Saturday, May 3, our anniversary, and Derby Day, we celebrated a wonderful, warm, and intimate wedding at the Five Bridges Inn in Rehoboth, MA . The following sign was at the end of the aisle as guest walked to the ceremony area. This was our first encounter with this statement. We think it is a very lovely thought to set a wonderful feeling and tone for the day.

 Please choose a seat not a side

We are all a family

Once  the knot is tied.

Have a wonderful and love filled day.

Charlie and Cheryl Cavalconte

www.weddingministersri.com

Ceremony Music

Pages and pages can and already have been written about music for the wedding ceremony, but here are a few more thoughts at the beginning of the wedding season just in case you might want to rethink some options.

We want to state from the beginning of this blog that we are active supporters of the arts and of young artists. Additionally, we also want to state, very emphatically, music is an essential and foundational aspect of your wedding ceremony. So, with that said, regardless of your taste in music whether from classical church organ music to funky contemporary rap played by a DJ, please, please, and please, engage musicians or a DJ who is competent, adept, and skilled in his or her art form. These individuals need not be concert musicians, but please, seriously, reconsider the idea about having a niece, a nephew, a neighbor or a friend play the music at your wedding ceremony because it “would be nice for them to do it and gain the experience”. Please repeat after us and say: NO! NO! NO! It will not be nice, for that matter, it will be very painful if they are not skilled. Why you might ask are we being so emphatic? We have celebrated a lot of wedding ceremonies and we have listened to a lot of bad music and it is embarrassing, painful, dreadful, time-consuming, distracting and in some cases, simply ridiculous. We will say this over and over again: your guests will more than likely not remember any specific words said during your wedding ceremony, however, they will certainly remember the feelings they had from your wedding ceremony. They more than likely will not remember the words of your vows, but they will remember the tenderness and sensitivity you had for each other. Similarly, they will remember the music was awful if it was awful! Squeaky, loud, out of tune violins playing the processional music as you walk down the aisle is not music. Your wedding is not the place for the local music school students to gain experience. Your wedding is NOT an educational opportunity! So, for a few more dollars, please, do yourselves and everyone else a favor and hire competent musicians or a DJ who knows what they are doing and are skilled and proficient in the craft of their art form and medium.

A final note: some might be scratching heads about our placing instrumentalists and DJ’s side by side in relationship to music for your ceremony. Here is the deal from our perspective: DJ’s are “playing” electronics. Like all musicians timing, queuing, grace, ease, volume, appropriate choice, ability, discretion (as in, not being noticed or trying to be the center of attention) are essential elements in performance. Electronic music at a wedding ceremony is, trust me, more than “pushing” the button on the iPod at the right time. More will be said about music and your wedding ceremony at a later date, so stay “Tuned” – no kidding!

Charlie and Cheryl Cavalconte

http://www.weddingministersri.com

Who is walking you down the aisle?

This is easily one of the most hotly contested subjects at the wedding rehearsal and later after the ceremony. Almost every person who has thought about getting married somehow sees him or herself walking down the aisle one way or the other. But how?

Our blog for today will consider the more traditional wedding. More often than not the male groomsmen, with the groom (Partner A), enters the ceremony site somewhat unceremoniously from the side and stands at the top of the aisle at the ceremony site, waiting for the balance of the bridal party to arrive: grand parents, parents, brides maids and then the bride (Partner B) walks down the aisle. So now the question: who is going to walk the bride down the aisle? There are several options: the most traditional is with dad or a male member of the family, then there area few other options: mom and dad together, whether bride parent’s are divorced or not. The bride walking with her children, regardless of whether the children are older or younger. Then, there is the bride coming down the aisle by herself. Lastly, a sort of new trend: bride and groom walk down the aisle together fully representing what the celebration is about: The two of them getting married to each other.

We would further like to suggest the language of “giving the bride away” as really no longer a fitting or even an acceptable phrase since it comes from a time when marriages were arranged and women were consider chattel. We have had many conversations with professional women: doctors, nurses, lawyers, college professors, company presidents, and founders, teachers, etc.: women who have been very successful in the worlds of business, academics, arts and science and yet some how have been talked into feeling the need to be accompanied and walked down the aisle. We ask the question: What does walking down the aisle accompanied by another “giving you away” say or symbolically represent? Is this a message you want to present? We pose the question for conversation.

Yes, there are traditions, however, how do they speak to this generation?